science, writing clubs, and other things I’m grateful for in 2021

I don’t like being told to produce gratitude, or much of anything else. I’m stubborn that way. And this has been a bad year, set in a series of bad years, a curse that definitely stretches back to the Cubs winning the World Series in 2016, and probably even before. (It’s the Cubs’ fault.) But, since nobody at work is telling me to perform gratitude … Continue reading science, writing clubs, and other things I’m grateful for in 2021

on the classes I actually remember from my mslis

I’m in a semi-functional haze today, as I try to hold down chat and work like a functioning adult despite having trouble sitting upright (you would not believe how I react to COVID boosters, holy shit), and so when I stumbled across a tweet about memorable classes from library school (or a lack thereof), it made me think a lot about my own memorable classes—or … Continue reading on the classes I actually remember from my mslis

Beyond the Caldecott & the Noble Is Coming! (Eventually!)

Like, I really hope it won’t be so much later that the old narrator quit and they had to hire a new one! But my massive list of lists is coming—it’s just going to be later than usual, and quite possibly in a slightly different format. This has been a super rough year for me, and I’m dealing (not terribly well) with my own chronic … Continue reading Beyond the Caldecott & the Noble Is Coming! (Eventually!)

On Reading Christopher Columbus

In fourteen-hundred-and-ninety-two, we’re taught, Christopher Columbus crossed the ocean blue. (There’s apparently a longer poem behind that, and I consider it an unfortunate example of literary work. I have no idea who wrote it, and I think it is objectively bad.) I have never been quite what one might call a fan of Columbus’s, but I also never really thought about him, at least in … Continue reading On Reading Christopher Columbus

Tommy Cabot Was Here (The Cabots Book 1)

Everett Sloane likes things neat, in tidy lines and ordered spaces. He’s a mathematician, and, if I’ve learned anything from my brother whose degree is in math, it’s that mathematicians do tend to love things with answers. (I went into humanities, and people are messy as hell.) But Everett’s carrying a messy secret past, and when it walks back into his life, it threatens to … Continue reading Tommy Cabot Was Here (The Cabots Book 1)

On Debbie Tung’s Book Love & the joy & romanticization of books

Debbie Tung’s graphic novel Book Love is a charming little piece, a celebration of the places books have taken Tung and the ways in which they’ve been (and are) her friends. It’s also a romanticization of both books and reading, and, I think, an interesting look at the ways in which we can romanticize the hell out of form and format. I read Book Love … Continue reading On Debbie Tung’s Book Love & the joy & romanticization of books

life, quilted: Bisa Butler’s Portraits at the Art Institute of Chicago

The women in my mother’s family tie off their quilts. I’m not entirely sure where it came from, though I will confess I’ve wondered if we’re tying off and tying elfknots into our own work (rather than our hair: mine is too straight to elfknot anyway) as a good-luck charm, or maybe a ward. (It’s not as though we remember why we have to have … Continue reading life, quilted: Bisa Butler’s Portraits at the Art Institute of Chicago

some stuff I’d love to see happen this school year

It’s now early September, which means that for most of us, school’s back in session, and has been for between two weeks and a month. It’s even back fully in person and “normal” for a lot of us, though I don’t know how long that will last. (I think it could last quite well—if folks are diligent about masking, and if everyone’s vaccinated. I don’t … Continue reading some stuff I’d love to see happen this school year

The Sealey Challenge: (Selections from) Liberamerica

Monchoachi’s Liberamerica, translated by Patricia Hartland for Ugly Duckling Presse’s Señal series, is a beautiful book, and a difficult book, and a book that demands to be read far more than once. It’s also a pretty incredible book with which to end this year’s Sealey Challenge. First, a bit of a disclaimer. I don’t have the facility with French that I have with Spanish—mine is … Continue reading The Sealey Challenge: (Selections from) Liberamerica