Fangs & Foul Play (issue 0-1)

Fangs & Foul Play (Issues 0-1), by L.K. Ingino and Alex Guenther with colors by Ilaria Fella and Mariam Yasser, letters by Joel Rodriguez, and editing by Chuck Pineau, is, fundamentally, very funny. I mean, okay, sure, it’s horror. But mostly it’s just funny. Issue 0 is “The Enthralling.” I guess our dudebro is “an ex-army colonel with a tortured past,” because Kickstarter told me … Continue reading Fangs & Foul Play (issue 0-1)

Slice of Life #1

Slice of Life, by Kat Calamia, Phil Falco, and Valeria Peri, with letters by Tyler Esposito and Garth Mattams, started out life on Webtoon Canvas. (Tangentially, I’m always sort of startled by the high quality of some of what hangs out on Canvas. Definitely not all, obviously, but some of it is better than a lot of the originals.) Slice of Life is marketed as … Continue reading Slice of Life #1

Vampire Emmy and the Garbage Girl

Vampire Emmy and the Garbage Girl, by Pat Shand, Roberta Ingranata, Carola Borelli, and Jim Campbell, is short and funny and surprisingly tender. It is, as the first section is titled, a Meet Cute—with, of course, vampires and shapeshifters and small demons (and raccoons). While they’re all collected in one volume, the book is itself almost a series of vignettes, an exploration of a burgeoning … Continue reading Vampire Emmy and the Garbage Girl

after National Librarian Day

It’s Easter, if you celebrate it on the western calendar, and also the midst of Ramadan, and right around Passover too. It is also, apparently, the day after National Librarian Day, and I have about as many feelings about that as I always have around National Library Week. Events like National Library Week and National Library Workers’ Day and National Librarian Day are meant, at … Continue reading after National Librarian Day

Any Way the Wind Blows: A Tor.com Original

Seanan McGuire’s “Any Way the Wind Blows,” published originally right here on Tor.com’s website, is very short, very funny, very charming, and very good. Which is far too many verys in one sentence, is it not? But it is a delightful little piece of writing. The premise is fairly simple: our captain and her crew, aboard the good airship Stubby (aka Her Majesty’s Stalwart Triumph … Continue reading Any Way the Wind Blows: A Tor.com Original

on serving preservice teachers during a time of book banning

Mine is a wildly varied job, one where I spend a large part of my time giving directions (printer’s over there, bathroom’s yonder, oh sorry you want the men’s bathroom that’s thataway, yeah we finally have a color printer again it’s yonder) and then can bounce in a moment to doing intensive research and hunting down difficult to find primary sources. (I’ve gotten really good … Continue reading on serving preservice teachers during a time of book banning

four mini reviews, four informational picture books

These aren’t quite capsule reviews, or even lightning reviews, but they are a series of short book reviews of informational kids’ books that I read on Friday—because, as a librarian who works with children’s literature a lot so I can serve preservice teachers and preservice speech therapists, I need to know that lit. And preservice teachers really need informational texts. Before I launch into these … Continue reading four mini reviews, four informational picture books

you don’t have to be smol to enjoy The Going to Bed Book

Everything sucks, the world is always on fire, I’m stretched so thin that I’m about to break (thanks overwork!), and so last night I really needed something special to unwind. Something that didn’t demand a hell of a lot of analytical abilities. Something with big font and easy words, because dyslexia is bad when stress and fatigue are bad. Something that was pretty light, both … Continue reading you don’t have to be smol to enjoy The Going to Bed Book

a ban on Maus will only put Maus into the hands of those who can already afford it

Look, I know a lot of people are arguing otherwise. They’re going to say that Tennessee’s ban on Maus, Art Speigelman’s multiple-award-winning tale of the Holocaust (where the Jews are anthropomorphized mice), will mean that Maus will make its way into more hands. People are gonna find that book, they say. Those kids are gonna read Maus. And all those other books that they’re banning, … Continue reading a ban on Maus will only put Maus into the hands of those who can already afford it

Beyond the Caldecott & the Nobel: Diverse Literary Award Winners 2021

This list is very late, and not as well laid out as I’ve done it in the past, but it’s finally here. I’ve linked out to the winners and honorees and, whenever possible, have also provided links to archived versions on the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. Happy reading! 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 American Indian Youth Literature Award, 2020 The American Indian Youth Literature … Continue reading Beyond the Caldecott & the Nobel: Diverse Literary Award Winners 2021

Thoughts on Witches, Midwives, & Nurses: A History of Women Healers, Second Edition

Back in 1973, the early days of feminism’s second wave, Barbara Ehrenreich and Deirdre English wrote Witches, Midwives, & Nurses: A History of Women Healers. The marvelous Feminist Press at the City University of New York reprinted it in this, its second edition, in 2010. It’s a fascinating little book, and also, I think, a hot mess. But I’m not sure, especially if we read … Continue reading Thoughts on Witches, Midwives, & Nurses: A History of Women Healers, Second Edition

so I have an essay in Meat for Tea: The Valley Review

It’s almost New Year’s, which is the perfect time to say that I’ve got a flash essay in Raw, otherwise known as volume 15, issue 4 of Meat for Tea: The Valley Review! The essay is structured as a recipe, although it’s not just about food: it’s about carrying on the traditions of people who would hate your guts. Basically, I guess it’s about family. … Continue reading so I have an essay in Meat for Tea: The Valley Review

science, writing clubs, and other things I’m grateful for in 2021

I don’t like being told to produce gratitude, or much of anything else. I’m stubborn that way. And this has been a bad year, set in a series of bad years, a curse that definitely stretches back to the Cubs winning the World Series in 2016, and probably even before. (It’s the Cubs’ fault.) But, since nobody at work is telling me to perform gratitude … Continue reading science, writing clubs, and other things I’m grateful for in 2021

on the classes I actually remember from my mslis

I’m in a semi-functional haze today, as I try to hold down chat and work like a functioning adult despite having trouble sitting upright (you would not believe how I react to COVID boosters, holy shit), and so when I stumbled across a tweet about memorable classes from library school (or a lack thereof), it made me think a lot about my own memorable classes—or … Continue reading on the classes I actually remember from my mslis

Beyond the Caldecott & the Noble Is Coming! (Eventually!)

Like, I really hope it won’t be so much later that the old narrator quit and they had to hire a new one! But my massive list of lists is coming—it’s just going to be later than usual, and quite possibly in a slightly different format. This has been a super rough year for me, and I’m dealing (not terribly well) with my own chronic … Continue reading Beyond the Caldecott & the Noble Is Coming! (Eventually!)

On Reading Christopher Columbus

In fourteen-hundred-and-ninety-two, we’re taught, Christopher Columbus crossed the ocean blue. (There’s apparently a longer poem behind that, and I consider it an unfortunate example of literary work. I have no idea who wrote it, and I think it is objectively bad.) I have never been quite what one might call a fan of Columbus’s, but I also never really thought about him, at least in … Continue reading On Reading Christopher Columbus

Tommy Cabot Was Here (The Cabots Book 1)

Everett Sloane likes things neat, in tidy lines and ordered spaces. He’s a mathematician, and, if I’ve learned anything from my brother whose degree is in math, it’s that mathematicians do tend to love things with answers. (I went into humanities, and people are messy as hell.) But Everett’s carrying a messy secret past, and when it walks back into his life, it threatens to … Continue reading Tommy Cabot Was Here (The Cabots Book 1)

On Debbie Tung’s Book Love & the joy & romanticization of books

Debbie Tung’s graphic novel Book Love is a charming little piece, a celebration of the places books have taken Tung and the ways in which they’ve been (and are) her friends. It’s also a romanticization of both books and reading, and, I think, an interesting look at the ways in which we can romanticize the hell out of form and format. I read Book Love … Continue reading On Debbie Tung’s Book Love & the joy & romanticization of books

life, quilted: Bisa Butler’s Portraits at the Art Institute of Chicago

The women in my mother’s family tie off their quilts. I’m not entirely sure where it came from, though I will confess I’ve wondered if we’re tying off and tying elfknots into our own work (rather than our hair: mine is too straight to elfknot anyway) as a good-luck charm, or maybe a ward. (It’s not as though we remember why we have to have … Continue reading life, quilted: Bisa Butler’s Portraits at the Art Institute of Chicago

The Sealey Challenge: (Selections from) Liberamerica

Monchoachi’s Liberamerica, translated by Patricia Hartland for Ugly Duckling Presse’s Señal series, is a beautiful book, and a difficult book, and a book that demands to be read far more than once. It’s also a pretty incredible book with which to end this year’s Sealey Challenge. First, a bit of a disclaimer. I don’t have the facility with French that I have with Spanish—mine is … Continue reading The Sealey Challenge: (Selections from) Liberamerica

The Sealey Challenge: Good Luck Gold and Other Poems

I’ve read rather a lot of Janet Wong’s back catalog this year, and today, my second-to-last day of the Sealey Challenge 2021, I read another: Good Luck Gold and Other Poems, originally published in 1994 (I had that shirt then too, btw), and just as relevant today as it was then. Good Luck Gold is a damn good book of poetry. I’ve said this with … Continue reading The Sealey Challenge: Good Luck Gold and Other Poems