Beyond the Caldecott & the Noble Is Coming! (Eventually!)

Like, I really hope it won’t be so much later that the old narrator quit and they had to hire a new one! But my massive list of lists is coming—it’s just going to be later than usual, and quite possibly in a slightly different format. This has been a super rough year for me, and I’m dealing (not terribly well) with my own chronic … Continue reading Beyond the Caldecott & the Noble Is Coming! (Eventually!)

The Sealey Challenge: (Selections from) Liberamerica

Monchoachi’s Liberamerica, translated by Patricia Hartland for Ugly Duckling Presse’s Señal series, is a beautiful book, and a difficult book, and a book that demands to be read far more than once. It’s also a pretty incredible book with which to end this year’s Sealey Challenge. First, a bit of a disclaimer. I don’t have the facility with French that I have with Spanish—mine is … Continue reading The Sealey Challenge: (Selections from) Liberamerica

The Sealey Challenge: Good Luck Gold and Other Poems

I’ve read rather a lot of Janet Wong’s back catalog this year, and today, my second-to-last day of the Sealey Challenge 2021, I read another: Good Luck Gold and Other Poems, originally published in 1994 (I had that shirt then too, btw), and just as relevant today as it was then. Good Luck Gold is a damn good book of poetry. I’ve said this with … Continue reading The Sealey Challenge: Good Luck Gold and Other Poems

The Sealey Challenge: Boys Quarter

Chukwuma Ndulue’s Boys Quarter is an exquisite, difficult, sometimes haunting chapbook, a collection of poetry that deeply explores time and space and self and, along with them, the haunting, violent presence of coloniality. Ndulue’s epigraph comes from Hart Crane, a snippet from “Voyagers” that sure sounds like it’s kissing goodbye to the innocence of youth, pointing out that “The bottom of the sea is cruel.” … Continue reading The Sealey Challenge: Boys Quarter

KidLit & Other Children’s Lived Experiences

I love youth literature, from board books to young adult novels (and nonfiction)—I don’t think that’s any secret. I’ve also been rather legitimized in my love since becoming liaison to an education department, and working closely with faculty to build lists (and collections) that can help support multiple different curriculum standards. It’s great! I truly love it! It’s also pushed me to think, a whole … Continue reading KidLit & Other Children’s Lived Experiences