Beyond the Caldecott & the Nobel: Diverse Literary Award Winners 2021

This list is very late, and not as well laid out as I’ve done it in the past, but it’s finally here. I’ve linked out to the winners and honorees and, whenever possible, have also provided links to archived versions on the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. Happy reading! 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 American Indian Youth Literature Award, 2020 The American Indian Youth Literature … Continue reading Beyond the Caldecott & the Nobel: Diverse Literary Award Winners 2021

The Sealey Challenge: (Selections from) Liberamerica

Monchoachi’s Liberamerica, translated by Patricia Hartland for Ugly Duckling Presse’s Señal series, is a beautiful book, and a difficult book, and a book that demands to be read far more than once. It’s also a pretty incredible book with which to end this year’s Sealey Challenge. First, a bit of a disclaimer. I don’t have the facility with French that I have with Spanish—mine is … Continue reading The Sealey Challenge: (Selections from) Liberamerica

The Sealey Challenge: Good Luck Gold and Other Poems

I’ve read rather a lot of Janet Wong’s back catalog this year, and today, my second-to-last day of the Sealey Challenge 2021, I read another: Good Luck Gold and Other Poems, originally published in 1994 (I had that shirt then too, btw), and just as relevant today as it was then. Good Luck Gold is a damn good book of poetry. I’ve said this with … Continue reading The Sealey Challenge: Good Luck Gold and Other Poems

The Sealey Challenge: Transit Blues

Keijiro Suga’s Transit Blues, translated from the Japanese largely by the author himself, is a strange, often luminous little chapbook, a collection of poetry that explores space and time (and corvidae) with a deft, loving touch. “Walking as a Prayer,” the first poem in the collection, sets the tone for the rest of the book: sometimes meditative, always elegant, loving and deft and tender. Suga … Continue reading The Sealey Challenge: Transit Blues

the saddest angriest black girl in town: a graphic novel by Robyn Smith

I have a disclaimer here: I backed Robyn Smith‘s The Saddest Angriest Black Girl in Town when Black Josei Press ran its Kickstarter for the second printing, and also, I’m pretty out of it today because I’ve been having an asthma attack ever since the power went out at work a couple days ago. So I am possibly biased, and definitely flaked out. Take that … Continue reading the saddest angriest black girl in town: a graphic novel by Robyn Smith

The Sealey Challenge: Lineage of Rain

There are times—like, a LOT of times—when I think about my MA advisor. I hear her voice; I see her banging a book on the table or emphasis, or waving it in the air, or demonstrating how one properly annotated one’s texts. (By which I mean: every single inch of potential white space is covered in one’s handwriting, which often loops out across the typeset … Continue reading The Sealey Challenge: Lineage of Rain

looking beyond the great white men of classical music

Today is Fanny Mendelssohn‘s birthday. Maybe you’ve heard of her: she’s Felix’s sister, and his equal, in genius, in musicality. But more likely you’re only familiar with her as Felix’s sister, if you’ve heard of her at all. You may know Clara Schumann‘s name, too—but you may not realize that she was one of the greatest pianists of her day, or that she, too, was … Continue reading looking beyond the great white men of classical music

my neighborhood celebrated this weekend

This is the sort of Family Neighborhood™ that is basically trademarked in the American psyche, filled with, you know, kids, dogs, and cats sitting in the window. There are birds everywhere and lots of open space and it is kind of disgusting, in that very cute suburban way. I am not from here, not really. I’m from Chicago, but I’ve now lived out here for … Continue reading my neighborhood celebrated this weekend

representative holiday books 2019

Christmas is coming (or it’s here!), the world’s a mess, and I guess that makes it time for a moderately representative holiday booklist! But, because I am a librarian, I’m going to start this list out with, first, a content note, and second, a disclaimer. The content note is fairly simple: this is in no way exhaustive; it is, however, a list that includes representative … Continue reading representative holiday books 2019